Diversity Employers

December 2015

Editorial objective:1- give diverse jobseekers sound information on job opportunities and how to successfully navigate the job search process,2- invite “employers of choice” to share success secrets and valuable information on where the jobs are.

Issue link: http://diversityemployers.epubxp.com/i/601905

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entleman, prepare yourself: One day you will rule the world." Those are words that Carnival Corporation's CEO Arnold Donald heard, three times a day, at the prestigious St. Augustine High School in New Orleans. While he has yet to rule the world, he certainly rules the world of cruising as CEO of the world's largest cruise company. Donald's 12-year tenure on Carnival Corporation's Board of Directors was what put him on Carnival's radar, to be selected as the successor to then CEO Micky Arison. Retired, but still on many boards for publicly traded companies, Donald was not expecting a call inform- ing him he was the board's top pick to succeed Micky as Carnival Corpora- tion's CEO. The board and Micky en- trusted Donald's visionary and inspira- tional leadership skills that have proved invaluable to Carnival Corporation. In 2013, Donald would become the frst person not part of the Arison fam- ily to lead the company. Micky Arison, son of Carnival Cruise Lines founder Ted Arison and majority owner of the NBA's Miami Heat franchise, supports Donald's leadership and allows him to make the necessary changes to help the company grow. A BORN LEADER Born and raised in New Orleans, Arnold Donald is no stranger to "the struggle." As an African American male who grew up in the South during a time where the right to vote was on the forefront of the civil rights move- ment, it would have been hard for him to dream of living the life he does now. Fortunately for him and his siblings, his parents knew the value of education and hard work. What now seems like a lifetime ago, Donald remembers drink- ing from separate water fountains in the segregated south. "While growing up, society was say- ing 'you're not good enough to drink out of this water fountain.' But my parents were saying, 'Son, you can do whatever you want to do.'" So when he enrolled into the African American, all-boys Catholic St. Augustine High School, the "rule the world" announce- ments heard three times a day fed his desire to succeed. Smart and curious, it was in his junior year of high school that he decided he wanted to be general manager of a Fortune 50 science-based company. It was a goal he would exceed beyond his wildest imagination. AN EARLY SWEET, SUSTAINABLE CAREER What steps does one have to take to lead a Fortune 50 company? The answer is not simple, at least not Donald's. He rejected offers from Yale, West Point and Stanford to attend Carleton College in Northfeld, Minn. He received his B.A. in economics and went on to earn a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Wash- ington University in St. Louis. With two degrees under his belt, Donald wasn't done equipping himself for his career. As the job offers rolled in, he accepted one from Monsanto, a sustainable ag- riculture company. While at Monsanto, he earned an M.B.A. in fnance from the University of Chicago. Donald started as a market analyst for Monsanto and quickly moved up in the ranks to product supervisor, where he built and marketed the weed deter- rent product, Round-Up. He increased the company's revenue to $2.5 billion. His proudest career moment was at Diversity Employers | DiversityEmployers.com | December 2015 3 " G "Gentleman, prepare yourself: One day you will rule the world." Those are words that Carnival Corporation's CEO Arnold Donald heard, three times a day, at the prestigious St. Augustine High School in New Orleans. St. Augustine High School was established in 1951 when racial division in New Orleans extended beyond the water fountains and restaurants and into schools. St. Augustine was built by the Archdiocese of New Orleans with funds provided by Catholics of the Archdiocese through the Youth Progress Program. The Society of St. Joseph of the Sacred Heart, to whom the operation of the school was entrusted, purchased the site for the school. Respect for students has always been a part of St. Augustine's history. The frst principal wrote: "Calling the students 'mister' would help ofset the negative impact of whites calling every black male 'boy' no matter what his age, his education, his standing in the community. Likewise, and for stronger reasons, the use of 'mister' would serve to negate the deleterious impact of the hateful use of the 'n' word." Although St. Augustine welcomes students of all races, it remains a leading secondary school for black males in Louisiana, and has long been nationally recognized in educational circles for outstanding success in preparing its students for higher education. The past sixty-fve years have been a history of accomplishment, living proof of what young African-American men can achieve if provided opportunity, academic preparation, discipline, moral and religious formation. - Melissa Duplantier The Arnold Donald funded building at St. Augustine High School in New Orleans. With two degrees under his belt, Donald wasn't done equipping himself for his career .

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